Affordable 800V IONIQ 3 & EV4 Leads 16 New Upcoming EVs from Hyundai Kia and Genesis!

In this special issue, we cover all the upcoming electric vehicles from the Hyundai Motor Group that spans all price points, from Hyundai, Kia and Genesis brands!


WATCH THE FULL VIDEO: https://youtu.be/9HQgep6cNzE

If you are a loyal follower of our site, dedicated to all things Korean cars, you might be having trouble keeping track of the myriad of the new electric car models that Hyundai motor company is expecting to release in its path to become an exclusive EV company, which can start as soon as 2025.


In this issue of Auto Vision, we hope to clarify what electric vehicles we can expect to see before 2025, to be prepared and make an informed purchasing decision. After all, with the countless type of EVs in all sizes and shapes, it would be easy to lose track of all the models. We will break down the vehicle information according to the type, estimated price, and availability date. Also, it would make sense to plan ahead since taking delivery of EVs can take a long time, especially the newly introduced models due to the global chip shortage problem.


Also known as the N3 platform, the 3rd generation platform can easily convert between ICE, hybrid, plug-in hybrid, electric, and even hydrogen fuel cell electric, and freely share any powerplants developed for the platform. So, this means any model developed using this platform can convert from an ICE car to an EV, with just a swap of the drivetrain.

Before we start, we need to clarify the difference between dedicated EVs and derivative EVs. Dedicated EVs are electric vehicles built from the ground up as EVs. These cars would be based on a dedicated electric platform, such as Hyundai’s EGMP or Electric Global Modular Platform, which is already legendary for its state of the art 800V charging architecture, that allows one of the world’s fastest charging times of just 18 minutes, to charge the battery from 10 to 80%.


On the other hand, there are derivative EVs, which are based on internal combustion engine cars with the drivetrain replaced with motors and batteries. Common sense dictates that the dedicated EVs are better because they are designed to be electric vehicles from the beginning, free of any unnecessary clutters from the donor internal combustion cars, which would be counterproductive to the efficiency of the EVs.


This might be true for most of the derivative EVs out there, including past-generation derivative electric cars, such as Kia Soul and Hyundai Kona, but the latest generation derivative EVs are really not derivative at all. EVs like the latest Niro EV is actually not an afterthought, but it has been developed from the start to be an EV. It’s just that it’s using the same multi-faceted platform that has the versatility of multi-use applications.


Derivative EVs like Niro EV is not an afterthought but was designed to be an EV from the beginning. (for more info: https://youtu.be/wURGZEj9nSY)


On the other hand, there are derivative EVs, which are based on internal combustion engine cars with the drivetrain replaced with motors and batteries. Common sense dictates that the dedicated EVs are better because they are designed to be electric vehicles from the beginning, free of any unnecessary clutters from the donor internal combustion cars, which would be counterproductive to the efficiency of the EVs.


This might be true for most of the derivative EVs out there, including past-generation derivative electric cars, such as Kia Soul and Hyundai Kona, but the latest generation derivative EVs are really not derivative at all. EVs like the latest Niro EV is actually not an afterthought, but it has been developed from the start to be an EV. It’s just that it’s using the same multi-faceted platform that has the versatility of multi-use applications.

The latest Niro EV and the soon-to-be-released next-generation Hyundai Kona EV, which will be based on the Niro, is underpinned by Hyundai’s latest 3rd generation platform that has been engineered to be highly modular and versatile. Also known as the N3 platform, the 3rd generation platform can easily convert between ICE, hybrid, plug-in hybrid, electric, and even hydrogen fuel cell electric, and freely share any powerplants developed for the platform. So, this means any model developed using this platform can convert from an ICE car to an EV, with just a swap of the drivetrain.


The all-new Hyundai Kona EV will be based on the new Kia Niro EV(for more info: https://youtu.be/TXojjKbJu0Y)

This will be the case for the new Niro EV and the next generation Kona EV, as the traditional internal combustion powerplant-based hybrid version will be introduced first, with the plug-in hybrid and the pure electric versions to follow. The all-new Niro EV and the next-generation Kona EV are expected to use the same outstanding 201 hp power electric system, combined with a 64 kWh battery pack from the outgoing model, which can achieve up to 300 miles of real range, greatly exceeding the published EPA range of 239 miles. The price of the all-new Niro EV is expected to increase modestly to $42,000 when it’s launched in mid-2022. The next generation Kona is slated for 2023, with a similar price as Niro EV.

Another benefit of the 3rd generation platform is that it can be utilized to build an EV from scratch if so required, and be converted to a hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle later, as Hyundai is still adamant about introducing more hydrogen vehicles in addition to the all-new Nexo, which is expected in a couple of years, utilizing the 3rd generation hydrogen fuel cell. It is really the next best thing or may even be a better platform than the famed EGMP. With all the versatility and flexibility, the 3rd generation platform can support the same 800-volt ultra-fast charging system, as well as the trademark bidirectional V2L function, just like EGMP based dedicated electric cars.


Genesis Electrifed GV70 is not based on E-GMP but features 800V charging system and V2L (for more info: https://youtu.be/ZPIvYqihwzY)


A good example of this is the upcoming electrified G80 sedan, and electrified GV70 SUV from Genesis. Both luxury electric cars are based on the 3rd generation platform and are proceeded by the respective internal combustion models, but the EV conversion renders performance that’s equivalent, if not exceeds that of E-GMP-based dedicated EVs.


The electrified G80 produces a total of 365 hp from its dual motors, capable of achieving 0 to 60 mph in just 4.5 seconds, driving all 4 wheels, which set the new record for the fastest electric cars from Korea, beating out EV6 GT-lines 5.1 seconds.


Genesis GV60 is the first Hyundai Motor Group car to feature the wireless charging system (for more info: https://youtu.be/roEKbG_I0bQ)


It also has the largest battery to date with an 87.2 kWh battery pack, good for a range of 265 miles or 426 km. The charging time is also similar to the EGMP based counterpart at 22 minutes 10 to 80%. The electrified G80’s estimated starting price is $65,000 and is expected to arrive in the spring of 2022. The electrified GV70 is a similar story, with the dual motors that produce 238 hp each for the system total of 476 hp, with boost mode to accelerate the beautiful SUV, 0 to 60 mph in blazing 4.0 seconds. The range is expected to be similar to the top-of-the-line, dual-motor Genesis GV60, which it borrows the power electric system from, at 250 miles or 400 km, powered by the same 77.4 kWh battery. With the estimated price of just under $55,000 for all the luxury, practicality of an SUV body, and performance, the electrified GV70 may represent the best value of all-electric SUVs coming in the next few years, especially if you are looking for a premium EV. The release dates of the electrified GV70 seemed to have been delayed until 2023, giving GV60 the head start and is expected to be released in Spring of 2022 along with the electrified G80.

The next set of derivative EVs that’s expected to make an introduction is the next-generation Hyundai Santa Fe and Sorento EVs. As a replacement for the current Santa Fe with the controversial styling, the all-new 5th generation model is expected to be a 3-row 7-passenger SUV, which will be built on the 3rd generation platform, to share the power electric system that’s currently being developed for the popular Kia Carnival, to convert it to the first-ever electric minivan from the Korean brand. The drivetrain is expected to be a derivative of the IONIQ 5 or the EV6 that ranges from 225 hp to 321 hp depending on the configuration. However, it’s not certain whether it will utilize the 800-volt bidirectional charging system like the Genesis EVs. When the all-new Santa Fe is released in 2024, the platform sharing Kia Sorento is likely to receive the full electrification treatment as well.


The 5th-generation Hyundai Santa Fe will be a 3-row SUV based on the N3 platform (for more info: https://youtu.be/DsLMVWK31aw)



FYI, the bigger Hyundai Palisade and the Kia Telluride, which will be facelifted shortly for release later this year will not be electrified, as the current largest SUV in the lineups are based on the older platform.


Speaking of large SUVs, there will be a pair of SUVs even larger than Palisade and Telluride. Unveiled in 2021, Kia Concept EV9 and Hyundai SEVEN concept are based on a 5,100 mm or 201 inches wheelbase EGMP dedicated EV platform. The production of dedicated electric SUVs that will result from the concepts, will be expected to be as big as Cadillac Escalade in overall size. The platform sharing Kia EV9, Genesis GV90, and the large Hyundai electric SUV is to be equipped with a 100 kWh battery for the targeted range of 400 miles or 650 km when they are introduced starting in 2023. However, they are expected to be the first beneficiaries to receive the latest hybrid lithium-metal battery for the improvement in the range up to 500 miles or 800 km.

Interestingly, the naming of the largest electric SUV from Hyundai is creating confusion because, although many still believe that it is expected to be called the IONIQ 7, as it was originally referred to, there is another electric SUV that will fill the slot between the IONIQ 5 and the larger SUV.

That model is known as Hyundai ME, which according to Hyundai-Kia’s codename guide, is a medium-sized electric vehicle, which is smaller than the models known as LV for Kia’s large electric vehicle EV9, and L-E, which is the Hyundai version of the Kia EV9, based on the SEVEN concept. So, it’s likely that the larger Hyundai electric SUV will be renamed IONIQ 9, to give way to IONIQ 7 medium-sized SUV.


The platform-sharing EV9 (Top) and IONIQ 9 will be as big as Cadillac Escalade! (For more info: EV9 https://youtu.be/7esWlVaLuy4, IONIQ 9 / SEVEN https://youtu.be/1RIjhKFxL4o)


Hyundai IONIQ 7 and its counterpart Kia EV7, will essentially be the dedicated electric SUV versions of the aforementioned Hyundai Santa Fe and Kia Sorento EVs, and as such will feature a 3-row seating configuration for 6 or 7 passenger capacity. Mechanically speaking, they will be nearly identical to the IONIQ 5 and the EV6. The styling will also be an extension of the siblings, except they will be taller and upright to take on more of the traditional SUV appearance for increased interior volume. The expected release date for the medium-sized dedicated electric SUV duo is 2023 with the price expected to be a few thousand dollars north of the IONIQ 5 and the EV6.


Hyundai IONIQ 3 will be one of the lowest priced 800V EVs with the starting price of $35,000 (For more info: https://youtu.be/pYkReZaO7gA)


To wrap up the dedicated EV lineup, the Hyundai motor group is planning for smaller versions of the IONIQ 5 and the EV6 known as IONIQ 3 and EV4. These compact EGMP-based SUVs were known to be the size of Kia Seltos, but it’s now rumored to be as big as Niro and Kona derivative E-V counterparts with a length of around 4,500 mm or 177 inches.

Being developed primarily for the European market, it’s not certain whether they would be available in markets like North America and Korea. But if they do, they will be sold at the estimated starting price of $35,000. They will be equipped with the essentially same power electric system as the IONIQ 5 and EV6 big brothers, but are expected to be offered with the CATL sourced LFP batteries instead of the NMC batteries used in the larger EVs to reduce the price.


Kia EV4 will feature the similar drivetrain as the bigger EV6 but will be equipped with LFP battery instead. (For more info: https://youtu.be/FOWk0R0PJGI)


Finally, the ultra-high-performance Kia EV6 GT with 576 hp, and the record-breaking 0-60 mph time of 3.5 seconds, is to be launched in October of 2022, with the Hyundai IONIQ 5 N counterpart to follow in 2023.


WATCH THE FULL VIDEO:https://youtu.be/9HQgep6cNzE